September 19, 2015

Seven Thoughts by G. K. Chesterton on Religion That Grow in Relevance by the Day

G. K. Chesterton, 1874-1936 

Gilbert Keith Chesterton was an English writer, lay theologian, poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, literary and art critic, biographer, and Christian apologist. He converted from High Church Anglicanism to Catholicism in 1922. Below is a selection of his quotes concerning religion:
It has been often said, very truely, that religion is the thing that makes the ordinary man feel extraordinary; it is an equally important truth that religion is the thing that makes the extraordinary man feel ordinary.
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The truth is, of course, that the curtness of the Ten Commandments is an evidence, not of the gloom and narrowness of a religion, but, on the contrary, of its liberality and humanity. It is shorter to state the things forbidden than the things permitted: precisely because most things are permitted, and only a few things are forbidden. 
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One of the chief uses of religion is that it makes us remember our coming from darkness, the simple fact that we are created.
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There are those who hate Christianity and call their hatred an all-embracing love for all religions.
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The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and left untried. 
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 Theology is only thought applied to religion.

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The riddles of God are more satisfying than the solutions of man.

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