August 7, 2015

If Protestants Martin Luther, John Calvin & John Wesley Were Alive Today They Would Agree with Humanae Vitae

Christendom's condemnation of contraception was universally followed by Catholics and Protestants alike until 1930. All Protestant denominations agreed with the Catholic Church’s teaching that contraception was sinful. At the 1930 Lambeth Conference, the Anglican Communion, for the first time, permitted contraception within marriage under certain circumstances. Consider these quotes by the Protestant reformers Martin Luther, John Calvin and John Wesley affirming the prohibition against conception:


[T]he exceedingly foul deed of Onan, the basest of wretches . . . is a most disgraceful sin. It is far more atrocious than incest and adultery. We call it unchastity, yes, a sodomitic sin. For Onan goes in to her; that is, he lies with her and copulates, and when it comes to the point of insemination, spills the semen, lest the woman conceive. Surely at such a time the order of nature established by God in procreation should be followed. Accordingly, it was a most disgraceful crime. . . . Consequently, he deserved to be killed by God. He committed an evil deed. Therefore, God punished him.
— Martin Luther


The voluntary spilling of semen outside of intercourse between man and woman is a monstrous thing. Deliberately to withdraw from coitus in order that semen may fall on the ground is doubly monstrous. For this is to extinguish the hope of the race and to kill before he is born the hoped-for offspring.
— John Calvin


Those sins that dishonor the body are very displeasing to God, and the evidence of vile affections. Observe, the thing which he [Onan] did displeased the Lord—and it is to be feared; thousands, especially of single persons, by this very thing, still displease the Lord, and destroy their own souls.
— John Wesley


[W]e must once again declare that the direct interruption of the generative process already begun, and, above all, directly willed and procured abortion, even if for therapeutic reasons, are to be absolutely excluded as licit means of regulating birth. Equally to be excluded, as the teaching authority of the Church has frequently declared, is direct sterilization, whether perpetual or temporary, whether of the man or of the woman. Similarly excluded is every action which, either in anticipation of the conjugal act, or in its accomplishment, or in the development of its natural consequences, proposes, whether as an end or as a means, to render procreation impossible. 
— Pope Paul VI, from his encyclical Humanae Vitae [14]

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