May 29, 2017

Memorial Day | 2017

Stars and stripes

May 29, 2017

"No one has greater love than this, to lay down
one’s life for one’s friends." (John 15:13)

In Memory of the Fallen

[Source]

Heavenly Father,
On this Memorial Day, we pray for those
who courageously laid down their lives
for the cause of freedom.
May the examples of their sacrifice
inspire in us the selfless love of Your Son,
our Lord Jesus Christ.

Bless the families of our fallen troops.
Fill their homes and their lives
with Your strength and peace.

In union with people of goodwill of every nation,
embolden us to answer the call
to work for peace and justice,
and thus, seek an end
to violence and conflict around the globe.
We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.

God of power and mercy, you detest war and the hubris of earthly pride. Banish violence from our midst and wipe away our tears, that we may all deserve to be called your sons and daughters. Keep in your mercy those men and women who have died in the cause of freedom and bring them safely into your kingdom of justice and peace. We ask this though Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. [Source]

May 28, 2017

Reflection for Pentecost Sunday

Pentecost Sunday

By Msgr. Bernard Bourgeois

Pentecost is one of the most joyful feasts on the Christian liturgical calendar. For fifty days the Church has been celebrating the great mysteries of Easter, most notably the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Pentecost is the conclusion of the Easter season. Today, the familiar story of Pentecost will be the first reading. The Spirit blows through the upper room where the disciples are hiding and, according to tradition, resides over each of them as tongues of fire. The disciples burst forth from that upper room to preach, teach, baptize, and celebrate the Eucharist. Most of them were martyred for their faith. Courage, strength, love, resolve, faith, and conviction were the marks of the apostles as they began their ministry to the known world after that experience of the Holy Spirit in the upper room.

Each Pentecost the Church prays that the same Spirit will make his appearance once again. The wind and fire of the first Pentecost is needed today as much as the apostles needed it while hiding in the upper room. The faithful hide today as they did in biblical times. Why? First, some want to sideline religious discussion and keep it far from influencing any policy or government action. They believe that religion is irrelevant to public discourse. If it has to exist at all, it does so as a quaint practice performed on Sunday mornings far removed from the “real work” of governments, business, healthcare, and education. The faithful have been convinced that religious discourse and conversation is solely a private matter. Second, the faith of Christians ought to be joyfully lived by each individual in his or her own life of home, work, and school. Some are afraid to do so. Again, religion is a private matter, or so polite society has declared. Leave your faith at the door, please. And so the Church hides as the apostles hid in the early Church.

On this Pentecost Sunday, let us ask the Spirit to blow through our Churches and communities. Let us open our hearts, minds, and souls to the presence of the Spirit as tongues of fire over our heads. The call of the early disciples is our call! Let’s stop hiding and commit ourselves to living our faith with joy and with the same courage and resolve as did the early Church. The point of this column is to call each individual Christian to live his or her faith as did the apostles after Pentecost. From the Spirit each person seeks courage, strength, love, resolve, faith, and conviction. As the apostles burst forth with love and joy, so today’s Christians are in desperate need of the same energy that inspired the apostles.

Do you have any idea the effect the Church could have on the world? A committed Christian can bring hope, love, forgiveness, and life to his or her world. A Christian who has been “fired up” by the Spirit does not tolerate hatred, racism, bigotry, gossip, cheating, or lack of respect for human life. If Christians live the Gospel, inspired by the Holy Spirit, they can bring the teachings and life of Jesus Christ to all whom they meet.

The influence of faith has a place in your home, workplace, in the voting booth, and among friends and family. Armed with the message of Christ, Christians can change the world! Let’s not be afraid to live the faith! Let’s not hide because some in society consider it impolite to discuss faith or morals, or what influences or scares you. Two caveats are important here. First, this column is suggesting that faith influence people only; it is not proposing that a religious organization run the government. Second, there is a fine line between sharing one’s faith and becoming arrogant or pushy. That line needs to be kept firmly in place. Arrogance has no place in Christian discourse.

Let’s pray that at this Pentecost the Spirit will blow through the homes of Christians everywhere inspiring them to live their faith with joy and courage. The values that come through Christian faith have the potential of transforming the world into a place of love, peace, and joy. Let’s get to it! Lord, send out your Spirit, and renew the face of the earth person by person!

Pentecost Novena to the Holy Spirit 2017 | Day 4

Holy Spirit

May 29, 2017

The Pentecost novena is the original novena prayer. After Christ's Ascension, the disciples prayed for nine consecutive days for the Spirit to descend. On the tenth day, Pentecost Sunday, they received the Advocate promised by our Lord. According to Father Michael Woolley, this period of prayer is a "little Advent":
The Disciples of Jesus waited those 9 days for the Holy Spirit with the blazing light of the Gospel to see by – while they waited in the Upper Room they reflected and prayed on the teachings and mighty deeds of Jesus, on His Passion and Death, on His Resurrection and Ascension, all of which enlightened their hearts and flooded the Old Testament Scriptures with light, revealing the hidden meaning of the Old Testament. (This is why during this "little Advent" we’re now in, we don’t wear dark Purple but bright White Vestments.)
Dearest Holy Spirit, confiding in Your deep, personal love for me, I am making this novena for the following request, should it be Your Holy Will to grant it:

(mention your request)

Teach me, Divine Spirit, to know and seek my last end; grant me the holy fear of God; grant me true contrition and patience. Do not let me fall into sin. Give me an increase of faith, hope and charity, and bring forth in my soul all the virtues proper to my vocation. I ask this through Jesus Christ our Lord and Savior. Amen.
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Novena to the Holy Spirit – Day 4

Today we pray for Patience

Let us bow down in humility at the power and grandeur of the Holy Spirit. Let us worship the Holy Trinity and give glory today to the Paraclete, our Advocate.

O Holy Spirit, by Your power, Christ was raised from the dead to save us all. By Your grace, miracles are performed in Jesus’ name. By Your love, we are protected from evil. And so, we ask with humility and a beggar’s heart for Your gift of Patience within us.

O Holy Spirit, you give lavishly to those who ask. Please give us the patience of the Saints who are now with you in heaven. Help us to endure everything with an eternal patience that is only possible with your help. Amen.

Come Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful and kindle in them the fire of your love. Send forth your Spirit and they shall be created. And You shall renew the face of the earth.

O, God, who by the light of the Holy Spirit, did instruct the hearts of the faithful, grant that by the same Holy Spirit we may be truly wise and ever enjoy His consolations, through Christ Our Lord, Amen.

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St. Madeleine Sophie Barat, Educator and Foundress

Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat

Optional Memorial, May 29th 

St. Madeleine Sophie Barat (1779 – 1865) was born a child of privilege in Joigny, France. She received an exemplary education, then went to Paris in 1795, at the height of the French Revolution, to enter the Carmelite Order. Her experience of Revolutionary violence in Joigny and Paris, however, caused a change of heart. In 1800, she founded the Society of the Sacred Heart whose mission was to make known the love of God revealed in the Heart of Christ, and to restore Catholicism in France through the education and catechesis of young women of every class.

Madeleine was baptized on the Feast of Saint Lucia (whose name means light), on December 13th, 1779. Her godfather was her older brother Louis. According to her family, she had been born prematurely when her mother was frightened by a fire. Subsequently, when asked as a little girl what it was that brought her into the world, the future saint and foundress would invariably answer: "Fire."

It was fitting. Madeleine was to spend her life spreading the fire of Christ's love. Her brother Louis, later a priest, initially instructed her in the Faith. Her dream of educating women regardless of their family’s financial means was realized with the establishment of her congregation. In September 1801, the first school was opened in Amiens, northern France. The new community and school grew quickly. A second school was opened in December 1802. Madeleine became the Mother Superior of the Society of the Sacred Heart when she was only 23 years of age.

She remained superior of the Society from 1806 until her death. Her spiritual leadership was centred on the love of God revealed in the Christ's Sacred Heart. She was committed to a deep life of prayer and reflection, and invited her fellow society sisters to do likewise in serving God and others. By the time of her death in 1865, St. Madeleine Sophie Barat guided an international community of 3,359 women, inspired by a deeply held spiritual ideal and offering education to women in Europe, North Africa, and the Americas. She was canonized on May 24, 1925, by Pius XI. Her incorrupt body rests in the Church of Saint Francis Xavier in Paris.

Homily for Pentecost Sunday, June 4, 2017, Year A

Pentecost Sunday

Fr. Charles Irvin
Senior Priest
Diocese of Lansing


In speaking with you about Pentecost I must speak of what cannot be fully explained. All we can do is reverently gaze into the mystery of God’s final movement toward us, the alienated and distant men and women who, with Adam and Eve, have broken off relations with God. Words cannot capture the enormity God’s merciful love for us; they buckle under the weight of it. So Scripture and the Church employ symbols to try to carry Pentecost’s meaning to us. Sometimes symbols are more effective than words in conveying the truth of stupendous events.

Essentially Pentecost is the final movement of God’s journey toward us. The initial movement begins in Genesis with God in the Garden of Eden. Note that it is God who makes the move. It is God who initiates; God who offers; God who loves us first. He chooses us. We do not choose him. He chooses us first because He is the superior. If it were otherwise, and indeed when people think they first choose God, then men and women in their pride would fancy that they are in control.

The story of the Tower of Babel is the story of the prideful people who thought they could build a tower to God. But in doing that they were usurping God’s role. They were the initiators, they were trying to be in control, they were setting the specifications, they were going to discover God and then they would determine His existence. What they forgot is that it is God who discovers man; it is God who determines our existence; God who speaks first. It is only when God speaks that things come into existence.

And so the story of the Tower of Babel is a recapitulation of the story of Adam and Eve. Once again man is filled with pride. Once again man tries to be God. And once again reality is fractured, nations are shattered, and destruction, disunion, misunderstanding, along with a total breakdown in communications occurs. Mankind now speaks in different languages and even people who so speak the same language are no longer able understand each other.

But in spite of human arrogance God continues to move toward us. God pursues us in His everlasting search for those who have strayed from the sheepfold of fundamental truth and reality. He sends us prophets, kings, and priests. The message of His love and truth flashes across the pages of human history and human religions. Finally, by the power of the Holy Spirit, Christ is born in the womb of humanity; a child is born to us, a Son is given us. He is named Mighty Counselor, Prince of Peace, the Anointed One who can heal those who are alienated, shattered, and miserable. God utters and sends His Word in a language that everyone can understand.

In the Incarnation God’s Word becomes flesh and God lives and moves even closer to us. On the Cross God’s Word hands over His Spirit and thus inaugurates God’s final movement toward us. Actually, in the context of the cosmic vision that we are seeing here, the death, resurrection, ascension, and Pentecost are events forming one unitary whole. In that context Pentecost becomes the completion of the Annunciation. The Word of God becomes human flesh and blood. Thus God enters not only our history, not only into our temples and holy places, but into human hearts and souls and all that it means to be human.

It is all so marvelous, all so universal and huge, all so beyond our comprehension, that mere words buckle and only symbols can hope to carry the precious freight. So we speak of the Dove, of the Wind-Breath of God, of the Paraclete, and of the tongues of fire. We are into the deepest part of the Mystery, namely that God created us not just to follow rules and regulations but in order that He might be intimate with us deep within us, in the deepest meanings of the word love, so that we can now live our ordinary lives in extra-ordinary ways. We are empowered now fill all that is ordinary with the extra-ordinary love of God.

The work of Christ in giving us His Holy Spirit is the work of bringing us into a language that we can all understand. It is the work religion, of re-ligamenting, of bringing our bare bones, dried up because of lack of love, back into one Body filled with the Blood of Christ and the life of God. The work of Christ in sending us His Holy Spirit is that of making us His blood brothers and sisters. The work of Christ and the Spirit is that of reconciling and forgiving, the work of loosening that which holds us in our own isolation and our sterile self-centeredness. The work of Christ, now raised in power by the Holy Spirit, is the work of bringing a holistic communion to a people that are alienated, fractured, shattered, and divided in the desert of not loving when they could have loved. The work of Christ and the Holy Spirit is overcoming sin. Sin is the name of all that has caused us to ignore our chances to be better persons. Sin is the name we put on all that hurts, divides, and separates us from each other and from God. But Christ has given us the power of the Holy Spirit to forgive and overcome sin.

The Church speaks in the tongues of all men and women of every race, culture, and nationality. She speaks with a common language because she utters God’s only and unitary Word. Of all the diversities in humanity the Church makes one inter-dependent unity. She is the opposite of the Tower of Babel because she is built by God, not by men and women. We call Pentecost “the birthday of the Church” because she is animated and ensouled on this day to speak and utter the Word of God and bring common understanding and common union in every language in a way everyone can understand.

Our task, therefore, is to be that source of healing for others. Ours is the mission of speaking God’s language where we work, among our colleagues, associates, friends and neighbors. Ours is the ministry of healing that which is divided, of inspiring those who have become jaded and cynical, of animating those who have lost hope, and of telling all who have missed their chances of being better persons that there is a second chance, because there is a Second Coming of Jesus Christ. The Holy Spirit is at work in the mysteries of life — in death, love, suffering, and beauty. Because of Pentecost God is to be found in the mystery of insight, those insights that turn truth into wisdom. He is present in the mystery of our self and in the mysteries of those round us. Anytime we struggle with these mysteries the Spirit of Pentecost is moving in us crying out: “Abba, Papa, Father” and our struggle becomes the question or questing of God’s meaning and purpose in our lives.

May the Holy Spirit become the Person whom you quest and the Spirit of your lives. And may you find moments in His presence… moments snatched away from the ordinary busy-ness of our daily lives, moments when you receive Wisdom, Understanding, Counsel, Knowledge, Strength, and Reverence for God’s mysterious presence and purpose in your life and in our shared lives.

Homily for the Seventh Sunday of Easter, May 28, 2017, Year A

Fr. René J. Butler, M.S.
Provincial Superior, La Salette Missionaries of North America
Hartford, Connecticut

(In many dioceses the Solemnity of the Ascension was celebrated on Thursday. This homily is based on the readings for the Seventh Sunday of Easter.)

The 12 Apostles
(Click here for today’s readings)

There is a saying you may have heard, which goes, “If you were accused of being a Christian, would they find enough evidence to convict you?” I don’t much like it, actually, because of its accusatory tone, but it certainly fits the context of today’s second reading from 1 Peter, which reflects a time when believers were in fact being punished for the crime of being Christians.

There are not a lot of reliable statistics about the persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire, but there is ample evidence of the fact. For example, Pliny the Younger, a Roman governor in what is now northern Turkey, wrote the following to the Emperor Trajan around the year 111 AD:

“In the case of those who were denounced to me as Christians, I have observed the following procedure: I interrogated them as to whether they were Christians; those who confessed I interrogated a second and a third time, threatening them with punishment; those who persisted I ordered executed. For I had no doubt that, whatever the nature of their creed, stubbornness and inflexible obstinacy surely deserve to be punished. There were others possessed of the same folly.

Soon accusations spread... An anonymous document was published containing the names of many persons. Those who denied that they were or had been Christians, when they invoked the gods in words dictated by me, offered prayer with incense and wine to your image..., and moreover cursed Christ—none of which those who are really Christians, it is said, can be forced to do—these I thought should be discharged.”

About 100 years later, a Christian named Tertullian wrote a defense of Christians which reflects the attitude of pagans toward them:

“Monsters of wickedness, we are accused of observing a holy rite in which we kill a little child and then eat it; in which, after the feast, we practice incest... [People consider] the Christians the cause of every public disaster, of every affliction with which the people are visited. If the Tiber rises as high as the city walls, if the Nile does not send its waters up over the fields, if the heavens give no rain, if there is an earthquake, if there is famine or pestilence, straightway the cry is, Away with the Christians to the lion!... [But] The oftener we are mown down by you, the more in number we grow; the blood of Christians is seed.”

Returning to Pliny:

“[Those who had once been Christians] asserted, however, that the sum and substance of their fault or error had been that they were accustomed to meet on a fixed day before dawn and sing responsively a hymn to Christ as to a god, and to bind themselves by oath, not to some crime, but not to commit fraud, theft, or adultery, not falsify their trust, nor to refuse to return a trust when called upon to do so.”

And that is precisely the attitude of St. Peter. “But let no one among you be made to suffer as a murderer, a thief, an evildoer, or as an intriguer.” In other words, suffer for being a Christian if you must, but please! never be arrested for a real crime. That would be a scandal and would only justify our accusers (as we know only too well in our time).

Martyrdom was the case with ten of the persons listed in the first reading. Of the Apostles, only John was not put to death.

The Gospel and the reading from Peter have a total of eight references to glory. This reminds me of another famous quotation from a martyr, St. Irenaeus, who died about the year 200, about 25 years before Tertullian. His most famous saying is usually given as “The glory of God is man fully alive,” but that translation is neither accurate nor complete. It actually reads: “The glory of God is a living man, but the life of man is the vision of God.”

The vision of God is not only the beatific vision we will enjoy in heaven. It is also and already the vision of faith that lights our path on earth. In that light we can accept being falsely accused, being mocked and stalked and talked about, while maintaining our Christian integrity and dignity. 

The “glory” we have been given is to be worthy of the name of Christian by being faithful to the name of Christ.

I close with one last quotation, adapted from Shakespeare:

"This above all: to thine own CHRISTIAN self be true, And it must follow, as the night the day,Thou canst not then be false to GOD OR any man."

May 27, 2017

Pope Saint Pius X on the Desire for Peace

Saint Pius X

"The desire for peace is certainly harbored in every breast, and there is no one who does not ardently invoke it. But to want peace without God is an absurdity, seeing that where God is absent thence too justice flies, and when justice is taken away it is vain to cherish the hope of peace. "Peace is the work of justice" (Is. xxii., 17).

There are many, We are well aware, who, in their yearning for peace, that is for the tranquillity of order, band themselves into societies and parties, which they style parties of order. Hope and labor lost. For there is but one party of order capable of restoring peace in the midst of all this turmoil, and that is the party of God.

It is this party, therefore, that we must advance, and to it attract as many as possible, if we are really urged by the love of peace."

— St. Pius X
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Prayer for St. Pius X's Intercession

Almighty ever-living God, who to safeguard the Catholic faith and to restore all things in Christ, filled Pope Saint Pius X with heavenly wisdom and apostolic zeal, graciously grant that, following his example and with his intercession, we may gain an eternal prize. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Pentecost Novena to the Holy Spirit 2017 | Day 3

Holy Spirit

May 28, 2017

The Pentecost novena is the original novena prayer. After Christ's Ascension, the disciples prayed for nine consecutive days for the Spirit to descend. On the tenth day, Pentecost Sunday, they received the Advocate promised by our Lord. According to Father Michael Woolley, this period of prayer is a "little Advent":
The Disciples of Jesus waited those 9 days for the Holy Spirit with the blazing light of the Gospel to see by – while they waited in the Upper Room they reflected and prayed on the teachings and mighty deeds of Jesus, on His Passion and Death, on His Resurrection and Ascension, all of which enlightened their hearts and flooded the Old Testament Scriptures with light, revealing the hidden meaning of the Old Testament. (This is why during this "little Advent" we’re now in, we don’t wear dark Purple but bright White Vestments.)
Dearest Holy Spirit, confiding in Your deep, personal love for me, I am making this novena for the following request, should it be Your Holy Will to grant it:

(mention your request)

Teach me, Divine Spirit, to know and seek my last end; grant me the holy fear of God; grant me true contrition and patience. Do not let me fall into sin. Give me an increase of faith, hope and charity, and bring forth in my soul all the virtues proper to my vocation. I ask this through Jesus Christ our Lord and Savior. Amen.
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Novena to the Holy Spirit – Day 3

Today we pray for Peace

Let us bow down in humility at the power and grandeur of the Holy Spirit. Let us worship the Holy Trinity and give glory today to the Paraclete, our Advocate.

O Holy Spirit, by Your power, Christ was raised from the dead to save us all. By Your grace, miracles are performed in Jesus’ name. By Your love, we are protected from evil. And so, we ask with humility and a beggar’s heart for Your gift of Peace within us.

The Saints were tempted, attacked and accused by the devil who is the destroyer of peace. When we are accused by the devil, come to our aid as our Advocate and give us Peace that lasts through all trials! Amen.

Come Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful and kindle in them the fire of your love. Send forth your Spirit and they shall be created. And You shall renew the face of the earth.

O, God, who by the light of the Holy Spirit, did instruct the hearts of the faithful, grant that by the same Holy Spirit we may be truly wise and ever enjoy His consolations, through Christ Our Lord, Amen.

Click to receive daily reminders for the Holy Spirit novena in your inbox.

May 26, 2017

Pentecost Novena to the Holy Spirit 2017 | Day 2

Holy Spirit

May 27, 2017

The Pentecost novena is the original novena prayer. After Christ's Ascension, the disciples prayed for nine consecutive days for the Spirit to descend. On the tenth day, Pentecost Sunday, they received the Advocate promised by our Lord. According to Father Michael Woolley, this period of prayer is a "little Advent":
The Disciples of Jesus waited those 9 days for the Holy Spirit with the blazing light of the Gospel to see by – while they waited in the Upper Room they reflected and prayed on the teachings and mighty deeds of Jesus, on His Passion and Death, on His Resurrection and Ascension, all of which enlightened their hearts and flooded the Old Testament Scriptures with light, revealing the hidden meaning of the Old Testament. (This is why during this "little Advent" we’re now in, we don’t wear dark Purple but bright White Vestments.)
Dearest Holy Spirit, confiding in Your deep, personal love for me, I am making this novena for the following request, should it be Your Holy Will to grant it:

(mention your request)

Teach me, Divine Spirit, to know and seek my last end; grant me the holy fear of God; grant me true contrition and patience. Do not let me fall into sin. Give me an increase of faith, hope and charity, and bring forth in my soul all the virtues proper to my vocation. I ask this through Jesus Christ our Lord and Savior. Amen.
___________________________________________________

Novena to the Holy Spirit – Day 2

Today we pray for Joy

Let us bow down in humility at the power and grandeur of the Holy Spirit. Let us worship the Holy Trinity and give glory today to the Paraclete, our Advocate.

O Holy Spirit, by Your power, Christ was raised from the dead to save us all. By Your grace, miracles are performed in Jesus’ name. By Your love, we are protected from evil. And so, we ask with humility and a beggar’s heart for Your gift of Joy within us.

All of the Saints are marked with an uncompromisable Joy in times of trial, difficulty and pain. Give us, O Holy Spirit, the Joy that surpasses all understanding that we may live as a witness to Your love and fidelity! Amen.

Come Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful and kindle in them the fire of your love. Send forth your Spirit and they shall be created. And You shall renew the face of the earth.

O, God, who by the light of the Holy Spirit, did instruct the hearts of the faithful, grant that by the same Holy Spirit we may be truly wise and ever enjoy His consolations, through Christ Our Lord. Amen.

Click to receive daily reminders for the Holy Spirit novena in your inbox.

Saint Augustine of Canterbury, Bishop and Missionary Who Converted Pagan Britain

Saint Augustine of Canterbury

May 27th, is the optional memorial of St. Augustine of Canterbury. He was born in Rome and died in Canterbury, England. An Italian Benedictine monk, at the behest of Pope Saint Gregory the Great, he founded the See of Canterbury and preached the Catholic faith to Britain’s Anglo-Saxon pagans during the late 6th and early 7th centuries. St. Augustine was the first Archbishop of Canterbury.
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St. Augustine of Canterbury, "Apostle of the English" (534 – 604)

St. Augustine was the agent of a greater man than himself, Pope St. Gregory the Great. In Gregory's time, except for the Irish monks, missionary activity was unknown in the western Church, and it is Gregory's glory to have revived it. He decided to begin with a mission to the pagan English, for they had cut off the Christian Celts from the rest of Christendom. The time was favorable for a mission since the ruler of the whole of southern England, Ethelbert of Kent, had married a Christian wife and had received a Gaulish bishop at his court. Gregory himself wished to come to Britain, but his election as pope put an end to such an idea. In 596, he dispatched an Italian monk following the comparatively new Rule of St Benedict.

Augustine set out with some companions, but when they reached southern Gaul a crisis occurred and Augustine was sent back to the pope for help. In reply the pope made Augustine their abbot and subjected the rest of the party to him in all things, and with this authority Augustine successfully reached England in 597, landing in Kent on the Isle of Thanet. Ethelbert and the men of Kent refused to accept Christianity at first, although an ancient British church dedicated to St Martin was restored for Augustine's use; but very shortly afterwards Ethelbert was baptized and, the pope having been consulted, a plan was prepared for the removal of the chief see from Canterbury to London and the establishment of another province at York. Events prevented either of these projects from being fulfilled, but the progress of the mission was continuous until Augustine's death, somewhere between 604 and 609.

The only defeat Augustine met with after he came to England was in his attempt to reconcile the Welsh Christians, to persuade them to adopt the Roman custom of reckoning the date of Easter, to correct certain minor irregularities of rite and to submit to his authority. Augustine met the leaders of the Welsh church in conference but he unfavorably impressed them by remaining seated when they came into his presence it is likely that in this he unfavorably impressed St. Bede too. Augustine was neither the most heroic of missionaries, nor the most tactful, but he did a great work. He was one of the few men in Gaul or Italy who, at that time, was prepared to give up everything to preach the gospel in a far country.

Adapted excerpt from The Saints edited by John Coulson.

Image source: Ordinariate News

Announcing the New Evangelization Award for Excellence in Catholic Blogging 2017

New Evangelization

N.B.: It was brought to our attention that Canon 212 does not meet requirement #1! (Thank you Sister S.) Nonetheless, our readership's support and our staff's appreciation of the site was so strong, we are honoring Canon 212 just the same (the 3 year requirement is tabled now and forever). JMJ Br. Bartholomew Joseph

We are pleased to announce the winners of the 3rd annual New Evangelization Award for Catholic bloggers and websites. The Catholic blogosphere is home to thousands of sites. These Catholic websites uniquely contribute to evangelizing and engaging a society which is hostile toward Judeo-Christian ideals and the "culture of life" of which St. John Paul II spoke. In order to qualify, a blog must:

1.) Have been in existence for at least 3 years

2.) Publish or feature content faithful to the Magisterium of the Church

3.) Evangelize and inform Catholics, and all who seek the fullness of truth

This year's recipients are:

Canon 212

Spirit-Digest

Servant and Steward

Thank you to our readers who nominated blogs for this award.

May 25, 2017

Saint Philip Neri — His Wisdom in 25 Quotations

St. Philip Neri

Saint Philip Neri was a 16th century Italian priest who was much beloved among the citizens of Rome for his compassion, humor and holiness. His devotion to God in serving others reminds us that living as a disciple of Christ is the source of joy. He was a great light of the Counter-Reformation, winning many souls for God.

There is nothing the devil fears so much, or so much tries to hinder, as prayer.
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A joyful heart is more easily made perfect than a downcast one.
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To preserve our cheerfulness amid sicknesses and troubles, is a sign of a right and good spirit.
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The best way to prepare for death is to spend every day of life as though it were the last.
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First let a little love find entrance into their hearts, and the rest will follow.
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The greatness of our love of God must be tested by the desire we have of suffering for His love.
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The Lord grants in a moment what we may have been unable to obtain in dozens of years.
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The cross is the gift God gives to his friends.
***
Christian joy is a gift of God flowing from a good conscience.
***
My children, if you desire perseverance, be devout to our Blessed Lady.
***
At communion we ought to ask for the remedy of the vice to which we feel ourselves most inclined.
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Obedience is the true holocaust which we sacrifice to God on the altar of our hearts.
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He who always acts under obedience may be assured that he will not have to give an account of his actions to God.
***
Cast yourself into the arms of God and be very sure that if he wants anything of you, He will fit you for the work and give you strength.
***
He who is unable to spend a long time together in prayer, should often lift up his mind to God by short prayers.
***
Believe me, there is no more powerful means to obtain God's grace than to employ the intercessions of the Holy Virgin.
***
We must often remember what Christ said, that not he who begins, but he that perseveres to the end, shall be saved.
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There is nothing more dangerous in the spiritual life, than to wish to rule ourselves after our own way of thinking.
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He who wishes for anything but Christ, does not know what he wishes; he who asks for anything but Christ, does not know what he is asking; he who works, and not for Christ, does not know what he is doing.
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The man who loves God with a true heart, and prizes him above all things, sometimes sheds floods of tears at prayer, and has in abundance of favours and spiritual feelings coming upon him with such vehemence, that he is forced to cry out, "Lord! let me be quiet!
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In sickness we ought to ask God to give us patience, because it often happens, that when a man gets well, he not only does not do the good he proposed to do when he was sick, but he multiplies his sins and his ingratitude.
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They who have been exercised in the service of God for a long time, may in their prayers imagine all sorts of insults offered to them, such as blows, wounds, and the like, and so in order to imitate Christ by their charity, may accustom their hearts beforehand to forgive real injuries when they come.
***
During mental prayer, it is well, at times, to imagine that many insults and injuries are being heaped upon us, that misfortunes have befallen us, and then strive to train our heart to bear and forgive these things patiently, in imitation of our Saviour. This is the way to acquire a strong spirit.
***
We are not saints yet, but we, too, should beware. Uprightness and virtue do have their rewards, in self-respect and in respect from others, and it is easy to find ourselves aiming for the result rather than the cause. Let us aim for joy, rather than respectability. Let us make fools of ourselves from time to time, and thus see ourselves, for a moment, as the all-wise God sees us.
***
If a man finds it very hard to forgive injuries, let him look at a Crucifix, and think that Christ shed all His Blood for him, and not only forgave His enemies, but even prayed His Heavenly Father to forgive them also. Let him remember that when he says the Pater Noster, every day, instead of asking pardon for his sins, he is calling down vengeance on himself.

Saint Philip Neri, pray that we serve God with joy and humility as you did.

Pentecost Novena to the Holy Spirit 2017 | Day 1

Holy Spirit

May 26, 2017

The Pentecost novena is the original novena prayer. After Christ's Ascension, the disciples prayed for nine consecutive days for the Spirit to descend. On the tenth day, Pentecost Sunday, they received the Advocate promised by our Lord. According to Father Michael Woolley, this period of prayer is a "little Advent":
The Disciples of Jesus waited those 9 days for the Holy Spirit with the blazing light of the Gospel to see by – while they waited in the Upper Room they reflected and prayed on the teachings and mighty deeds of Jesus, on His Passion and Death, on His Resurrection and Ascension, all of which enlightened their hearts and flooded the Old Testament Scriptures with light, revealing the hidden meaning of the Old Testament. (This is why during this "little Advent" we’re now in, we don’t wear dark Purple but bright White Vestments.)
Dearest Holy Spirit, confiding in Your deep, personal love for me, I am making this novena for the following request, should it be Your Holy Will to grant it:

(mention your request)

Teach me, Divine Spirit, to know and seek my last end; grant me the holy fear of God; grant me true contrition and patience. Do not let me fall into sin. Give me an increase of faith, hope and charity, and bring forth in my soul all the virtues proper to my vocation. I ask this through Jesus Christ our Lord and Savior. Amen.
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Novena to the Holy Spirit – Day 1

Today we pray for Charity

Let us bow down in humility at the power and grandeur of the Holy Spirit. Let us worship the Holy Trinity and give glory today to the Paraclete, our Advocate.

O Holy Spirit, by Your power, Christ was raised from the dead to save us all. By Your grace, miracles are performed in Jesus’ name. By Your love, we are protected from evil. And so, we ask with humility and a beggar’s heart for Your gift of Charity within us.

The great charity of all the host of Saints is only made possible by your power, O Divine Spirit. Increase in me, the virtue of charity that I may love as God loves with the selflessness of the Saints. Amen.

Come Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful and kindle in them the fire of your love. Send forth your Spirit and they shall be created. And You shall renew the face of the earth.

O, God, who by the light of the Holy Spirit, did instruct the hearts of the faithful, grant that by the same Holy Spirit we may be truly wise and ever enjoy His consolations, through Christ Our Lord. Amen.

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Saint Philip Neri, Priest, the Third Apostle of Rome

Saint Philip Neri

Saint Teresa of Avila was reported to have said, “From silly devotions and sour-faced saints, Lord deliver us.” Though he probably never heard those words, one of her contemporaries, Saint Philip Neri, lived as if he had. This delightful man, known as “the cheerful saint,” believed that a life of humility and piety did not exclude a person from having a sense of lightheartedness. If anything, he had a profound appreciation of humor as a Godly gift, to be used for spiritual renewal.

St. Philip Neri was born in Florence, Italy, in 1515. As a young man, he was sent away to live with an older cousin to learn the family business. It was soon evident that this was not the vocation God had in mind for him. Philip became a tutor, eking out a living while studying theology and philosophy. Three years later, he decided, out of humility, not to pursue ordination to the priesthood. Instead, he would spend the next thirteen years of his life actively engaged in contemplation, prayer and service to the least of God's people, especially the poor and the sick.

Philip loved to pray, especially at night. During one of these nocturnal vigils, in the catacombs of Saint Sebastian in 1544, a remarkable thing happened: Philip felt the Holy Spirit, as a globe of light, enter his mouth and sink to his heart. So filled was he with love for God and a burning desire to serve Him, that his heart literally expanded. An autopsy performed after his death revealed that two of his ribs had been broken and reshaped into an arch to accommodate the change.

The Church was desperately in need of such a heart. The Protestant Reformation had begun two years after Philip’s birth, and the Council of Trent, convened to both solidify the teachings of the Church and reform some of her practices, met for the first time in 1545. Although he had resisted it for years, at the advice of his confessor, Philip finally pursued ordination and became a priest in 1551. He became known as an insightful and charitable confessor himself. It wasn’t long before his ministry attracted many seeking to deepen their relationship with God.

Rather than form a religious order, in 1575, Philip Neri began an Oratory (a community founded for both prayer and service which includes laypeople.) As a confessor, Philip realized people needed not only absolution, but continued spiritual guidance. He concluded that telling penitents not to do something was not enough. They must perform acts of virtue in addition. Consequently, he organized excursions to Rome’s seven churches which included informal talks with penitents. They would pray and sing hymns, before going out to serve those in need. Some condemned such actions as “introducing novelties” into the Church’s spirituality and attacked Philip’s character. Despite this period of trial, eventually his detractors saw the value in his methods. By the time he died at 80 in 1595, he was seen as one of the greatest figures of the Counter-Reformation.

St. Philip Neri is the patron saint of Rome, youth and military special forces. His feast day is May 26th. He was so beloved by the citizens of the Eternal City that he is known as the Third Apostle of Rome, after Saints Peter and Paul. Father, you continually raise up your faithful to the glory of holiness. In your love kindle in us the fire of the Holy Spirit who so filled the heart of Saint Philip Neri. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever. St. Philip Neri. help us to open our hearts to God.

May 24, 2017

Solemnity of the Ascension of the Lord

The Ascension of Our Lord Jesus Christ

The Ascension of Jesus

When they had gathered together they asked him, "Lord, are you at this time going to restore the kingdom to Israel?" He answered them, "It is not for you to know the times or seasons that the Father has established by his own authority. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, throughout Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth." 

When he had said this, as they were looking on, he was lifted up, and a cloud took him from their sight. While they were looking intently at the sky as he was going, suddenly two men dressed in white garments stood beside them. 

They said, "Men of Galilee, why are you standing there looking at the sky? This Jesus who has been taken up from you into heaven will return in the same way as you have seen him going into heaven."

— Acts 1; 6-11
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Forty days after his Resurrection, Christ ascended into heaven. His Ascension marked the end of his earthly ministry. Having conquered sin and death, Jesus ascended to receive the glory due him [Philippians 2:8-11], mediate on our behalf [Hebrews 9:24], send the Holy Spirit promised at the Last Supper [John 16:7], and prepare a place for us in eternity [John 14:2]. Immediately following the Ascension, an angel informs the disciples that Christ’s Second Coming will occur in the same way. According to the Catechism [668], "Christ's Ascension into heaven signifies his participation, in his humanity, in God's power and authority." Our Lord’s Ascension bridges his Incarnation in humility with his coming again at the end of time as King and Supreme Judge of the universe.

Almighty ever-living God, who willed the Paschal Mystery to be encompassed as a sign in fifty days, grant that from out of the scattered nations the confusion of many tongues may be gathered by heavenly grace into one great confession of your name. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.